I’ll Be Home for Christmas

 

Christmas at the Chateau de Cheverny

I’ll be home for Christmas   

You can plan on me

Please have snow and mistletoe

And presents on the tree

“I’ll Be Home for Christmas” is a Christmas perennial written by the lyricist Kim Gannon and composer Walter Kent and recorded in 1943 by Bing Crosby, who scored a top ten hit with the song. The song is sung from the point of view of a soldier stationed overseas during World War II, writing a letter to his family. In the message, he tells the family he will be coming home and to prepare the holiday for him.

So, with that little intro, I want to wish everyone a very merry Christmas and hope that you are all home with your family and friends, enjoying delicious nibbles and a glass of bubbly in front of a roaring fire.

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TURKEY DAY!

“What do you mean you cooked the turkey, Charlie? You put our national bird in the oven. We had our mouths all set for roast eagle with all the trimmings.

It’s kinda scrawny isn’t it?

Yeah well, I thought I would stuff some old bread in it and make it look a little fatter….” – excerpts from Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America Volume One: The Early Years, recorded by Capitol Records in 1961.

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The Land of Dordogne

I would take them all to my home and cook them a grand Perigord meal. We’d start with a soup made from a duck’s carcass. We’d then go on to an omelette au touffe with eggs from my own chickens and truffles from the hillside near our home. I would cook Aiguillette de canard, using a thin strip of meat just below the breast. I would cook it with mustard seeds and honey. I would add to that, pommes sarladaise, which are potatoes thinly sliced and cooked in duck fat, with garlic, parsley, and truffles. It would all be done in the Perigord style.

And the wines?

The white wine would be a Bergerac sec from Chateau Jaubertie. Then I would offer everyone a deeply robust 2005 Chateau de Tiregand. It’s made by a friend of mine in the village. Oh, and I’d also serve some foie gras. I would serve it with a glass of chilled sweet wine, Monbazillac from Chateau de Tirecul. It’s something akin to Sauternes. I would finish it off with some cheese, of course.” – from The Resistance Man by Martin Walker

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